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Classic Seafood Recipes & Fish Recipes
SEAFOOD SAUCES: from Anchovy Catchup to White Sauce

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SEAFOOD SAUCE RECIPES

 STORE SAUCES
 Anchovy Catchup (1851)
 Bechamel Sauce (1896)
 Caper Sauce (1896)
 Cucumber Sauce (1896)
 Drawn Butter Sauce (1896)
 English Sauce (1845)
 Fish Sauce (1903)
 Gooseberry Sauce (1845)
 Hollandaise Sauce I (1896)
 Hollandaise Sauce II (1896)
 Kitchiner's Fish Sauce (1851)
 Lemon Sauces (1903)
 Lobster Butter (1845)
 Lobster Catchup (1851)
 Lobster Sauce (1805)
 Lobster Sauce (1896)
 Steward's Sauce (1845)
 Maitre D'Hotel Butter (1896)
 Oyster Catchup (1851)
 Oyster Sauce (1805)
 Oyster Sauce (1851)
 Oyster Sauce (1896)
 Pontac Catsup (1845)
 Quin's Sauce (1845)
 Remoulade (1845)
 Sea Catchup (1851)
 Sharfe Fish Sauce (1903)
 Shrimp Chatney (1845)
 Shrimp Sauce (1805)
 Shrimp Sauce (1896)
 Tartar Sauce (1845)
 Tartar Sauce (1879)
 Sauce Tartare (1896)
 Tartare Sauce (1903)
 Tomato Sauce (1896)
 Sauce Tyrolienne (1896)
 White Sauce (1896)

HOW TO MAKE TARTAR SAUCE
(New Orleans 'Item', November 16, 1879)


There are two good ways in which a Tartar sauce may be made. You can try whichever you please; but if you are in a hurry the second will suit your purpose better than the first

1st:—Catch a young Tartar: for the old ones are very tough and devoid of juice. To catch a Tartar is generally a very unpleasant and at all times a difficult undertaking. A young Tartar will probably cost you at least $10, 000—and perhaps your life—before you get through with him: but if you must have Tartar sauce you must be ready to take all risks. Having procured your Tartar you must kill him privately, taking care that the act shall escape the observation of the police authorities, who would probably in such a case be strongly prejudiced in favor of the Tartar. Having killed, skinned and cleaned the Tartar, cut off the tenderest part of the hams and thighs; boil three hours, and then hash up with Mexican pepper, aloes and spices. Add a quart of mulled wine and slowly boil to the consistency of honey. You will probably find the Tartar sauce very palatable; and if hermetically sealed in bottles with the addition of a little Santa Cruz rum, will serve for a long time. The rest of the Tartar will not keep, and must be disposed of judiciously.

2nd:—Take the yolk of a hardboiled egg, a teaspoonful of mustard, a tablespoonful of olive oil, a little vinegar, a little parsley and pickled cucumber, and hash up very fine.


 

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